PushFlows Task​Push​Flows ​Task

Available on: >= 0.17.0

Push your Flows to a Git Repository.


How it works

The PushFlows task is a powerful integration that allows you to push your code to Git from the UI while still managing this process entirely in code! Kestra unifies the development experience between the UI and code so you can combine the best of both worlds without sacrificing the benefits of version control.

The process is simple: you can build your flows in a development namespace using all productivity features of the Kestra UI (such as the built-in code editor, autocompletion, syntax validation, documentation, blueprint examples, live-updating topology view, output previews, replays, execution and revision history) and then push them to Git after you have tested and validated them.

The task allows you to easily push one or more flows from a given namespace (and optionally also child namespaces) to any Git-based Version Control System.

Additionally, the dryRun property will help you see what files will be added, modified, or deleted without overwriting the files on Git yet.

Let's look at a few common patterns of using the PushFlows task.

Before you begin

Before you start using the PushFlows task, make sure you have the following prerequisites in place:

  1. A Git repository where you want to push your flows.
  2. A Personal Access Token (PAT) for Git authentication.
  3. A running Kestra instance in a version 0.17.0 or later with the PAT stored as a secret within the Kestra instance.

Using the dryRun property

Let's start by creating a single hello_world flow in the dev namespace and pushing it to a Git repository. We'll initially set the dryRun property to true to validate the changes before committing them to Git.

yaml
id: hello_world
namespace: dev

inputs:
  - id: greeting
    type: STRING
    defaults: kestra

tasks:
  - id: welcome
    type: io.kestra.core.tasks.log.Log
    message: welcome to {{ inputs.greeting }}

Here is a system flow that will push the hello_world flow to a Git repository:

yaml
id: push_to_git
namespace: system

tasks:
  - id: commit_and_push
    type: io.kestra.plugin.git.PushFlows
    username: git_username
    password: "{{ secret('GITHUB_ACCESS_TOKEN') }}"
    url: https://github.com/git_username/flows
    branch: develop
    flows:
      - hello_world
    sourceNamespace: dev
    targetNamespace: prod
    gitDirectory: flows
    commitMessage: "changes to kestra flows"
    dryRun: true

Given that the dryRun property is set to true, the task will only output modifications without pushing any flows to Git yet:

git1

Pushing a single flow to Git

Let's now set the dryRun property to false and push the hello_world flow to Git:

yaml
id: push_to_git
namespace: system

tasks:
  - id: commit_and_push
    type: io.kestra.plugin.git.PushFlows
    ...
    dryRun: false

You should see the following log message:

git2.png

And here is what you should see in the Outputs tab:

git3.png

When you click on the commit URL from the logs or from the Outputs tab, you'll be redirected to the commit page on GitHub:

git4.png

Now, you can create a pull request and merge the changes to the main branch.

git5_pr.png

Pushing all flows from a single namespace to Git

To see how you can push all flows from a given namespace to Git, let's create two more flows in the dev namespace:

yaml
id: flow1
namespace: dev
tasks:
  - id: test
    type: io.kestra.core.tasks.log.Log
    message: this is too easy

The flow2 flow is just a copy of the flow1 with a different flow ID and message:

yaml
id: flow2
namespace: dev
tasks:
  - id: test
    type: io.kestra.core.tasks.log.Log
    message: the simplest dev-to-prod workflow ever

git6_all_flows.png

Let's now adjust the system flow to push all flows from the dev namespace to the develop branch:

yaml
id: push_to_git
namespace: system

tasks:
  - id: commit_and_push
    type: io.kestra.plugin.git.PushFlows
    username: git_username
    password: "{{ secret('GITHUB_ACCESS_TOKEN') }}"
    url: https://github.com/git_username/flows
    branch: develop
    sourceNamespace: dev
    targetNamespace: prod
    gitDirectory: flows
    commitMessage: "push all development flows to Git and create a PR"
    dryRun: true

Again, we can set the dryRun property to true to see what files will be added, modified, or deleted based on the Git version without overwriting the files in Git yet:

git7.png

Now if you change the dryRun property to false and run the system flow again, you should see all three flows being pushed to the flows directory on the develop branch with the exact commit messages we have specified in the commitMessage property:

git8.png

Pushing all flows including child namespaces

Finally, we get to the fun part of pushing all flows from the dev namespace including all child namespaces. Kestra will automatically create a subfolder for each child namespace and push the flows there to keep everything organized.

Let's create two more flows in the dev.tutorial namespace:

  1. hello_world_1 flow:
yaml
id: hello_world_1
namespace: dev.tutorial

inputs:
  - id: greeting
    type: STRING
    defaults: hey

tasks:
  - id: print_status
    type: io.kestra.core.tasks.log.Log
    message: hello on {{ inputs.greeting }}
  1. hello_world_2 flow:
yaml
id: hello_world_2
namespace: dev.tutorial

inputs:
  - id: greeting
    type: STRING
    defaults: hey

tasks:
  - id: print_status
    type: io.kestra.core.tasks.log.Log
    message: hello on {{ inputs.greeting }}

To include all child namespaces in our Git commit, we only need to add the includeChildNamespaces property, set to true:

yaml
id: push_to_git
namespace: system

tasks:
  - id: commit_and_push
    type: io.kestra.plugin.git.PushFlows
    username: git_username
    password: "{{ secret('GITHUB_ACCESS_TOKEN') }}"
    url: https://github.com/git_username/flows
    branch: develop
    sourceNamespace: dev
    targetNamespace: prod
    gitDirectory: flows
    commitMessage: "push all flows"
    includeChildNamespaces: true

When you run this final system flow, you should see the following output:

git9.png

And here is a confirmation that all flows from the dev namespace and its child namespaces have been pushed to the Git repository:

git10.png

Here is a simple table to illustrate how flows are mapped to files in the Git repository:

FlowSource namespaceGit directory path
hello_worlddevflows/hello_world.yml
flow1devflows/flow1.yml
flow2devflows/flow2.yml
hello_world_1dev.tutorialflows/tutorial/hello_world_1.yml
hello_world_2dev.tutorialflows/tutorial/hello_world_2.yml

You can see that each child namespace is represented as a subfolder in the Git repository, and all flows are neatly organized in their respective directories.

Extra notes

  • The flows property allows you to specify a list of Regex strings that declare which flows should be included in the Git commit. By default, all flows from the specified sourceNamespace will be pushed (and optionally adjusted to match the targetNamespace before pushing to Git). If you want to push only the current flow, you can use the {{flow.id}} expression or specify the flow ID explicitly, e.g. myflow. You can also use this property to push only specific flows โ€” you have full flexibility to customize this task to your preferred deployment strategy.
  • The branch property allows you to specify the branch to which files should be committed and pushed. If the branch doesnโ€™t exist yet, it will be created.
  • The commitMessage property allows you to specify the Git commit message. You can use templating to include dynamic values in your commit message.
  • The gitDirectory property allows you to specify the directory to which flows should be pushed. If not set, flows will be pushed to a Git directory named _flows and will optionally also include subdirectories named after the child namespaces. If you prefer, you can specify an arbitrary path, e.g. kestra/flows, allowing you to push flows to that specific Git directory.
  • If you omit the targetNamespace, the sourceNamespace will be used as the targetNamespace by default. The targetNamespace is an optional mechanism to help you prepare your development flows to be merged into the production branch/namespace. If you set the targetNamespace, the sourceNamespace in the source code will be overwritten by the targetNamespace so that you can seamlessy sync the flows to production.
  • If you try to add the Personal Access Token (PAT) directly in your source code in the password property, you will get an error message. This is a safety mechanism to prevent you and your users from accidentally exposing your PAT in the source code. You should store the PAT as a Kestra Secret, environment variable, namespace variable or as a SECRET-type input in your flow.

git11_credential_detected.png

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